If you want to know the time …

Ask a policeman.

When I was a lad in England this was a popular song often played on the wireless. My father, a policeman, would tell me that it was evidence of the trust we placed in the men in blue. If I were lost or just wanted to know the time I could safely approach a policeman.

In fact the song was written by Edward William Rogers in 1888 and was a monster hit in the Music Halls of the day for Mr James Fawn. In runs through five verses and choruses of innuendo that the audience of the day would have latched onto in a flash.

The first chorus sets the scene …

Chorus.
If you want to know the time, ask a policeman.
The proper Greenwich time, ask a policeman.
Every member of the force has a watch and chain, of course,
How he got it, from what source? ask a policeman.

The police were drawn mostly from the working classes and paid a meagre salary how could they afford a watch and chain, expensive items in those days?

If you didn’t click the link above do try it now and if you’d like to learn more of the song’s history and see the full lyrics there is an excellent site <HERE>.

But those days are long gone. So much has changed. In those days you could ride a bike without a helmet, a deristricted sign meant that there was no speed limit, the police couldn’t stop you without a reason, there was freedom of movement, freedom of speech and freedom of assembly.

One thing that hasn’t changed is the regard in which we hold the police. Christine Nixon, former Chief Commissioner of Victoria Police did her bit by lying to the public about the role of African gangs in Melbourne’s crime statistics, topped off by going out to tea with her phone switched off as Victoria burnt one Black Saturday. Simon Overland, former Chief Commissioner, was in charge of the Purana Taskforce during the period that Nicola Gobbo, lawyer to the stars, was informing on her clients. Graham Ashton, former Chief Commissioner, has just been excoriated by a royal commission for suggesting that such outrageous behaviour passed “the pub test” because it was all in a good cause.

The present Chief Commissioner, Shane Patton, has shown himself excellently well qualified to run a Police State. His force managed to subdue and handcuff a pregnant woman in front of her children in her own home for a facebook post. I understand that she may be facing a 15 year jail term. Well serves her right, she should have organised a Black Lives Matter rally or a union protest both of which are exempt.

Mr Patton has resurrected or borrowed or invented the offence of outraging public decency. He should be careful with a hairstyle that does just that.

Welcome to China, have a nice day. It must be part of the Belt and Road agreement.

They All Think They’re Churchill …

The daily dose of Dan and the other politicians is stirring stuff …

We will fight on the beaches, we will fight on the landing grounds, we will fight in the meatworks …

and there’s every chance we will fight in the supermarkets that are suddenly meat free zones. Thank goodness I’m a vego. And what is it about toilet paper?

Stage 4 restrictions for the majority of Victoria’s population Stage 3 for the rest of us. Almost no valid reason to let anyone into your house only four valid reasons to leave it. House arrest. There does still seem to be a social licence for these measures. The other day’s Herald-Sun had some snippets from half a dozen persons in the street all in favour. The tone crystalises into putting up with short term pain for long term gain.

There is emerging some disquiet and disobedience. The utter nutters are in the vanguard declaring Covid19 a hoax or blaming it on the 4G network. Just to make sure that they have no protection by way of civil rights Mr Andrews has declared a state of emergency giving the police supernatural powers, after all, these people are not Black Lives protesters or union members picketing a building site.

Following the Covidiots are the invincibles, mostly young with little to fear beyond the death of a grandmother here and there. They don’t believe that Covid will kill them. The government tells them it will but mostly that’s untrue.

The current strategy is to limit the spread of the virus by severely limiting the movement of people. I do believe it will work. I expect that in a couple of weeks case numbers will begin to come down quite quickly. But then what?

The population of Australia is 25 million people. As of yesterday there had been 18,318 cases of Coronavirus infection. That means that 99.94% of the population are naive to this virus. Unless there are no cases left in the community there will be a third wave once restrictions are lifted. If there are indeed no cases we will all be safe … until we open our borders.

Will there be social licence for stage 5 restrictions when the populace realises that this isn’t short term pain?

Another Glass of Red …

Cheers.

It’s from 2017 grown and made in our own little slice of paradise.

We enjoyed another little sojourn in the bush. We live in splendid isolation and prefer to camp in splendid isolation. The only other human that we came close enough to talk to was at the fuel stop going and coming back and that is the one closest to home in any case.

How isolated is isolated? This is the map of a morning ride. It’s 13km from the bottom to the top of that red line so a swathe of country about 50km wide. There’s not a town or a named feature on it, one of the things I love about Australia.

Best bird in the couple of days was Gilbert’s Whistler and we came across this little guy …

We also came across the Shire of Hindmarsh Ranger, his job is to enforce the local laws …

 

A Brief Escape …

The accursed Covid has certainly changed our lives. Gayle and I were not intending to spend the winter in Victoria. Another road trip to the tropics looked good. It wasn’t to be. Nonetheless we are better off than many. Locked in a tower block apartment has got to be a nightmare. Fortunately for us we live in a sparsely populated rural location which wasn’t locked down when restrictions were reimposed on Melbourne.

We can’t go far but western Victoria is available and we’ve been keen to go to Woomelang for a look at their little silos. We camped by the lake at Wooroonook the first night. It’s a spot we can reach in little more than an hour. We were blessed with a clear sky, a perfect night for a glass of red by a campfire.

The landscape is pretty well flat but 8km away there is an isolated hill that gives a good view of the surrounding country. The mountain bike and I made it to the top of Mt Jeffcot. The view was splendid and the descent was terrifying.

Strava segments are named by their creator. Presumably this one is not part of a naked bike ride. And for a timid rider like myself you’d want shorts on to hide the fact that you’d packed your daks.

After lunch it was off to Woomelang for some small scale silo art. There are seven portable silos with work by a variety of artists scattered around. This sort of silo is often called a field bin. The artists that were issued with corrugated ones got the short straws. They were definitely at a disadvantage. I was particularly struck by the Western Pygmy Possum and the Mallefowl …

The camp that evening was in Black Box woodland at Lake Albacutya.

In the morning it was back on the bike …

The lake was dry as it usually is. When the Wimmera River carries enough water it spills through Lake Hindmarsh to Albacutya and then into Wyperfeld National Park. It hasn’t happened so far this century! It does have a nice concrete boat ramp for the next occasion.

A walk turned up some nice birds including Chestnut-rumped Thornbill and Scarlet Robin. My second cuckoo for the “spring” was calling prominently – Pallid Cuckoo.

After that it was home again, home again as a westerly front blew in bringing a gale and some heavy rain.

Colbinabbin …

More silo art, the paint has barely dried.

Colbinabbin is about 160 km north of Melbourne and about 54 km from the nearest large town, Bendigo.

The artwork is by the Benalla artist Tim Bowtell and it is a splendid accomplishment. It celebrates local history from the Colbo Picnic of the early 1900s through the days when steam was king to a tractor pull from the 1980s.

For the photographer interested in where the light will be coming from the artwork faces south.

Colbinabbin is situated in north central Victoria. It’s the home of the Colbinabbin Football and Netball Club, AKA the Hoppers and it has a shop or two. Parking and visibility of the art is excellent. It’s a terrific project that I’m sure will do the town some good.

R3R …

The big day.

The start

Most of these fit looking people are about to ride 108 km. I on the other hand will wimp it out with a mere 33.

That’s an average speed of 23.9 km/h – in line with expectations. Happy with that. The biggest climb is towards the end; fortunately there was still some gas in the tank.

It felt good to arrive back at the Maryborough Station and I’m sure it felt even better to the real heroes after 108 km …

Burning issues …

Gayle and I have friends around the globe. The current fires in Australia are making headlines everywhere and friends are emailing almost daily with concerns for our safety. My friends are, of course, more intelligent than the average consumer of the main stream media so I’m writing this to give them some background that the TV news won’t be covering. It is written from a personal perspective. Australian readers can stand down.

If you live in Victoria you live with the threat of bushfire. Every spring the authorities warn us to expect fires and to be ready. Some years the message is that the wet winter has contributed to vegetation growth and the fires will be worse this year. Other years the message is that a dry winter has produced a dry fuel load and the fires will be worse this year. Fires are a fact of life every year but some years are much worse than others.

Living here it is likely that you know someone who has been seriously impacted by fire. In 1969 fire swept across the Geelong to Melbourne Road killing 18 people including a couple of Gayle’s good friends. Gayle’s aunt lost her home in the 2009 fire as did a birdwatching friend of mine. Gayle grew up on Melbourne’s fringe. Her first memory of fire is as a primary school kid standing in the garden directing water from the hose up into the guttering. Mum had blocked the downpipes  (traditionally you do that with tennis balls). Dad was at work. Burning embers were raining down on the house which survived undamaged. We have had a couple of adventures ourselves in previous summers when we’ve been camping. These are tales for another time.

Unprecedented seems to be the buzz word this year. There seems to be a flaw in the human mind that quickly diminishes the severity of past events. Perhaps without it we would all be single child families and headed for extinction. The worst in living memory means we haven’t seen anything like it for several weeks. Bushfire and the Australian Landscape have been companions for millennia each shaping the other.

Since European settlement the largest Victorian bushfire in terms of area was in February 1851 which burnt through 5 million hectares (12,355,270 acres). The greatest loss of life occurred in February 2009 – 173 people died. The biggest events earn themselves names …

Black Thursday 1851

Black Monday 1865

Red Tuesday 1898

Black Sunday 1926

Black Friday 1939

Ash Wednesday 1983

Black Saturday 2009

we’re not particularly imaginative with our creek names either Dry Creek, Sandy Creek, One Mile Creek, Two Mile Creek …

So the reality is that wildfire happens often. It is part of the natural cycle of regeneration of eucalypt forests and no matter where you are in Victoria the dominant tree is a species of eucalypt.

Our weather conspires against us. Evaporation greatly exceeds precipitation through our hot dry summers. Add to that the regular cycle as low pressure systems pass by coming from the west. Typically the wind turns northerly, temperatures and wind strength increase over a few days ahead of a westerly change. The days of highest risk are days with temperatures in the 40s (>104°F) and a north wind with speeds above 35kph (20 knots). A fire starting on such a day is likely to head south on a fairly narrow  front with windborne embers travelling ahead of it producing spot fires.

When the change in weather comes the temperature drops the wind turns westerly and is usually even stronger for a while. The easterly flank of the fire is now a long fire front. Loss of property is greater after the change.

You are fairly safe in Victoria’s larger towns although I have vivid memories of burning leaves fluttering down on Melbourne suburbs from fires in the surrounding hills. Agricultural areas, once the winter crops have been harvested are reasonably safe. Forested areas are going to burn, if not this time their turn will come. The place you least want to be is on a hilltop in a forested area with a single winding road in and out.

The lesson I took from the last great fire in 2009 is this … When fire breaks out you’re on your own. People died in the chaos. Communications break down. There is no way to know which road offers a safe exit or leads to disaster. On that occasion the chief of emergency services had gone out to dinner and switched off her mobile phone. Leave early.

Since then the authorities have given us an app. It’s quite good especially when you don’t need it. It is pretty slow when you do and it only works if you have internet coverage. More importantly it seems that the community has realised that there is no shame in heading for safety rather than dying with a garden hose in hand. Evacuation has not been mandatory in Victoria until this year.

The Country Fire Authority keeps us informed of the fire risk with categories like Severe, Extreme and Code Red. Houses are not designed to withstand code red fires. When the risk is high a Fire Ban is declared which not only prohibits doing a spit roast outside but also the use of angle grinders, welding, chain saws and any activity of similar risk.

So where are we placed in all of this? We are in an agricultural area of the Goldfields west of centre of the state. The present major fires are in the far east of the state. That doesn’t mean the next fire won’t be here. Earlier this summer a large fire burnt to within 4 km before it was controlled. Even closer, some neighbours 1 km away set their paddock alight driving a car around in long grass. Fortunately the wind was blowing towards their house not ours on the day. The fire was quickly extinguished by our volunteer fire brigade.

Our preparation always starts in spring with cleaning up any fallen branches and mowing the long grass. On 20 acres that’s quite a lot of work but there comes a day when it gets too hot and dry for the grass to grow and we put the mower away until autumn. Council inspections start in November and if you haven’t cut the grass by then you can expect a harsh reminder.

On high risk days we stay close to home and keep an eye on the emergency app and listen to the radio. Ours is a very small community, when fire is getting close the girls get on the phone to share their observations and so we know who is where. You don’t want someone putting themselves at risk trying to rescue you from an empty house while you’re safe and sound 20km away.

Our fire plan is a simple one. Run away. Our greatest risk is a fire starting close and to the north on a code red day. The road we live on runs north-south and is tree-lined, behind us is a creek also tree lined and running north-south. Our electricity supply is strung between poles and comes from the north. Our water supply is rainwater collected off the roof and stored in tanks. Fighting a raging fire with limited water after the electric pumps have quit is an unappealing prospect. The road south is a way better option.

After the change the fire would come from the west. There is little in the way of trees to help it along from that direction. It’s agricultural land, the crops are in and the sheep have reduced the grass to ground level.

A really big fire makes its own wind but the fuel locally isn’t sufficient to do that to us (I hope). Our driveway is 250 metres long and runs between an avenue of Red Ironbarks (Eucalyptus tricarpa). Should they be alight there are two alternative exits, one of which involves cutting two fences. We would go in seperate vehicles one being the mobile home – somewhere to live if the house goes up. The wire cutters are in the mobile home. Wind from the north we head south. Wind from the west we head east.

Our important papers are stored off-site. The house is insured. Life is precious. QED.

For the moment the worst of the effects for us is the smoke. At its worst it will make your eyes water and throat sore. It comes and goes at the whim of the wind.

Just as we’ve forgotten our previous fires we’ve also forgotten our previous droughts. The geologic record shows us that there have been times when Australia has been warmer and wetter than present and also colder and drier. The last decade has been the warmest on record. Of course the record is not all that long. The world has been slowly warming since the Little Ice Age so you’d expect each decade to be a tad warmer than the last.

During the last century not only has our temperature increased so too has our rainfall. Drought happens and the last three years have brought us a bad one but not unprecedented and overall Australia is getting wetter. Don’t believe me then take a careful look at this graph from the BoM.

As to climate change and fire the trend should show better in global data than in regional data and it just doesn’t …

many consider wildfire as an accelerating problem, with widely held perceptions both in the media and scientific papers of increasing fire occurrence, severity and resulting losses. However, important exceptions aside, the quantitative evidence available does not support these perceived overall trends. Instead, global area burned appears to have overall declined over past decades, and there is increasing evidence that there is less fire in the global landscape today than centuries ago.

That’s from Doerr & Santin, 2016 the paper is available on line.

The cost of fire depends largely on the density of settlement in fire prone areas. The death toll depends largely on peoples response to fire – currently people are tending to evacuate which will save many lives. The frequency of wildfire is influenced by fuel management. Australia seems to be ambivalent regarding this. When prescribed burns increase summer fires decrease but environmental organisations tend to get excited. Perhaps even more oddly my local reserve may be burnt for the greater good but if I pick up fallen wood from the roadside I may be prosecuted for gathering firewood illegally.

So friends and concerned readers be reassured that we are well but never complacent. On a wider front our hearts go out to those in less fortunate positions and our admiration for our fire fighters knows no bounds. And if you’ve lent us some of yours we thank you sincerely.

If you want to read more about life in a densely settled area on top of a forested hill Google “cockatoo cfa.gov.vic.” Clicking on the top result leads to a comprehensive pdf.

Uplifting …

The Great Stupa of Universal Compassion has reached new heights. It’s located not far from Bendigo and I’ve watched it slowly take shape over recent years. It has looked odd with a flat roof.

I was there at 5am this morning as the cranes rumbled in through the gates. Not long after 7 the lift began. Structures that had been assembled on the ground were slowly hoist into the air and delicately deposited on the roof …

One more piece to go, probably in January.

Wooroonook Lakes …

Worth a visit if only to say you’ve been there. But practice first …

The lakes are 263 km north-west of Melbourne.

There are three lakes, the middle and east lakes are in the care of Parks Victoria and are frequently and presently dry. The other lake is managed for recreation, water is purchased when needed to keep the enterprise afloat. No prize for guessing where the wildlife can be found.

Camping is inexpensive, powered sites are available for the softies. There is a playground for the kids, a boat ramp and clean toilets and showers. It’s a popular spot with the fishing fraternity, families and the grey nomads. It’s close enough to my home to use as a picnic spot. I have just camped there for the first time.

I took my cue from this guy and spent a lot of my time sitting quietly on the bank.

Australian Shelduck

It’s amazing what you see …

Black-fronted Dotterel

Then for a moment they stand side by side

Then a quick shower and back to work as if nothing happened …

All very familiar, really.

Entertainment was also provided by the Musk Ducks. The males have quite a peculiar appearance with something resembling a scrotum hanging from their chins. At this time of year they are extremely intolerant of other males. When one wanders into their territory there is a rapid rush from the owner. This guy is the victor …

Musk Duck

and this the vanquished. His “scrotum”  has ended up plastered on the side of his face in his rush to get to safety …

Australasian Grebes are in their breeding finery.

Australasian Grebe

The freshly returned summer migrants were calling loudly. Rufous Songlarks and the Australian Reedwarblers (formerly known as Clamorous) were making themselves known by calling almost continuously. This guy just makes an occasional “kek kek kek” but then he has the benefit of good looks …

Sacred Kingfisher

The White-browed Woodswallow is another stunner. Or at least the male is.

White-browed Woodswallow

And the influx of inland species into Victoria continues. Crimson Chats at Wooroonook, who’d have guessed?

Crimson Chat
Tree Martin

 

I noticed that some Tree Martins were  collecting nesting material from one particular spot at the water’s edge so I took my chair and sat with the sun behind me in the hope that they would continue despite my presence. After a while they did.

I was keeping very still with the camera always raised, they were landing practically at my feet. While this was going on a Baillon’s Crake emerged just a few degrees to the left. These birds are so cryptic and so nervous that even a glimpse is unusual. A photograph like this is an absolute bonus.

To cap off the day the late afternoon sun side lit the River Red Gums right in front of my camp site. All I had to do was put down my glass of red and raise the camera one more time.

Nullawil …

While McGee was swanning around Western Australia another silo in Victoria was given a makeover. The little town of Nullawil (population 93 in 2016, proud possessor of a Post Office since 1897) is the latest addition to the state’s Silo Art Trail.

The artist on this occasion is Sam Bates with a masterly depiction of a farmer and his working dog. There is a rumour that he began at the bottom and ran out of space at the top …

This is very unlikely to be true. In my opinion he chose to omit the upper half of the farmer’s face to emphasize the importance of the dog. In the same way I’ve omitted the ears to emphasize the eyes in this detail …

Nullawil is about 300 km north west of Melbourne on the Calder Highway. There is a little take-away food store opposite the silo.